People Share What Childhood Memories They are Recreating for Their Own Kids
My parents always had a present waiting for me to open at breakfast for my birthday! with wrapped birthday gift with pink polka dot paper
New Baby Parenthood

People Share What Childhood Memories They are Recreating for Their Own Kids

By Emily Ramirez

Reddit user u/ThrowawayyyyuyhwlH recently asked about what kinds of childhood memories people are trying to recreate for their own kids, and the answers are as 'awwww' inducing as they are inspiring.

The chain of goodness got kicked off with this question:

Is there anything that you loved about your childhood that you try to recreate for your LO?

"One of my favorite specific memories was waking up after a nap to the smell of dinner cooking. My toddler's nap schedule is timed just right so she’s waking up just after I’ve started cooking dinner most nights. Seeing my partner carry her into the kitchen with sleepy eyes and a sleepy smile and watching her sniff the air and seeing the “mmmm that smells good!” thought process in live action is one of my favorite things ever!"

The OP then added this oh-so-important caveat:

EDIT: and if you didn’t have the greatest childhood yourself, what traditions have you made sure to implement now with your own family that make your heart warm and fuzzy?? 😁 - u/ThrowawayyyyuyhwlH

Here are some of our favorite responses:

Better than a warm hug

My mom would always throw a clean, warm pile of laundry on top of me straight out of the dryer. It was such a nice, snuggly feeling that I still do it to myself every once in a while when I’m feeling anxious. Definitely want to do the same thing with LO - u/lmwolf1014

The power of music

For me, it's waking up to music playing in the other room. My dad was a whistle while you work kind of guy and every morning our house was full of music. It was a very happy way to wake up, and he was always so much fun with music playing. It carried over to my adult life and made chores a pleasant activity. I even had a career in music for a time. I realized I wanted to do stuff like that with my kids though because my Dad passed when I was 15. Music was the gift he left me because with one song I can close my eyes and he's there singing along, beating on stuff like he's playing the drums and I can have him back for that moment. I wanted my kids to have that too because I know I won't be around forever. - u/Warlord_of_Mom

Simply silly

My grandmother had snapdragons in her garden and she would make them talk to me in a silly voice. My girls keep an eye out for snapdragons every time we go on a walk because I do that for them. -u/moretaj

Clocking in for play

My dad threw his work bag in the same spot when he gets home and it signals “Daddy’s back! No more work! Daddy is now ready for play!” And I do the same with my work bag - u/sizzlesfantalike

A Really Big Deal

When I was a kid, it was a Really Big Deal to get your own library card and be able to check out whatever books you wanted. My kid just started kindergarten and is working on his reading, so we're going to get him his own library card this weekend!

Birthday breakfast

My parents always had a present waiting for me to open at breakfast for my birthday! It always made me feel like I was starting off the day with something super exciting and fun, rather than having to wait all day. It didn’t have to be a huge gift, but I always looked forward to it the most. - u/maggleswaggles

It's the little things

I remember quiet Sundays with my mom. We’d bake something or do a craft. As I got older, we’d both post up on the couches in the living room and read silently for hours.

Then I had the complete opposite kind of Sundays with my dad. We’d get in the truck and blast music. He’d let me talk his ear off, and we’d get fast food.

Those memories just remind me to be there during the normal days for my daughter. I couldn’t put a specific date on any of those memories, and they feel the most important. I still do those things to comfort myself or celebrate a good mood. Now as an adult, the Christmas, Halloween, and birthday craziness has faded, it’s the everyday stuff that made a real impact. - u/GirlintheYellowOlds

Joy ride

My fondest memory of early childhood was riding in the back seat of my dad’s Mustang convertible. He’s had many of them over the years but the first one I remember was cherry red with a tan cloth roof. I sold my Mustang when I was pregnant, but I plan to get another one when my girl is a bit older so she can feel the wind in her hair. - u/bread_cats_dice

Shake it off

After my bath, my mom always recited the same poem to me. It’s called “after my bath”

The end of the poem goes “just think how much less time it would take, if I were a dog I would shake shake shake.” and I would shake in my little towel and each “shake” got louder.

I now recite this to my twins after their bath, they’re only 10 months old but I hope they have fun with it like I did. - u/mama_snafu

Making it up as we go along

I don’t have a lot of great memories from my childhood but I’m slowly trying to recreate things with my LO that’s just “our thing.” Baby is just a baby right now but every morning after he’s done nursing and takes his morning snooze we wake up, turn on some rock and I dance two full songs with him. He loves it. I love it. And it starts our day off right. - u/Zeropossibility

When it rains...

There are many but here is a recently adopted one: Growing up when it was a really heavy rainy day my Dad would proclaim "It's raining. Let's make pakoras" and make a huge pile of them for us all to eat. This usually happened in the afternoon. My Dad would be happily cooking up a storm in the kitchen and me and my siblings would be watching TV or something under the sound of the rain.

My parents visited us a few weeks ago to meet our 11 month old for the first time (pandemic kept us apart) and I asked him to teach me how to make pakoras because I would love to do this quirky tradition as my kids grow. I look forward to the next time we get a good rainy day so I can exclaim "It's raining. Let's make pakoras!" :) - u/Dense-Champion-81

Surprise sleep over

On Friday nights when my parents were on their way to bed, they’d get me and my brother out of our beds (still sleeping usually) and put us on the couch or a floor mattress in the living room. We were then able to wake up in the morning and watch Saturday morning cartoons while snuggled up. It was at least twenty years later that it was actually a treat for my parents because they could sleep in longer without us bothering them. Lol. My brother and I LOVED it. My kids are a bit too young to do this still, but I look forward to this day. - u/copihuetattoo

On weekends, we brunch

My father used to make this huge brunch every single Sunday and invite friends or family to eat with us. I remember the house being so full of joy and laughter every weekend because of it. I wish I can recreate something like that with my own kids one day when they grow up. - u/sahdogmom

What's a family tradition you plan on continuing?

Or what's something you've started up new since becoming a parent of your own? We'd love to hear about it in the comments.

Our next reco: You Don't Have to Have a Great Mom to Be One







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